CSS Indexes

W3C Group Note,

More details about this document
This version:
https://www.w3.org/TR/2022/NOTE-indexes-20220524/
Latest published version:
---
Editor's Draft:
https://drafts.csswg.org/indexes/
History:
https://www.w3.org/standards/history/indexes
Feedback:
CSSWG Issues Repository
Inline In Spec
Editor:
Tab Atkins-Bittner
Suggest an Edit for this Spec:
GitHub Editor

Abstract

A listing of every term defined by CSS specs.

CSS is a language for describing the rendering of structured documents (such as HTML and XML) on screen, on paper, etc.

Status of this document

This section describes the status of this document at the time of its publication. A list of current W3C publications and the latest revision of this technical report can be found in the W3C technical reports index at https://www.w3.org/TR/.

This document was published by the CSS Working Group as a Group Note using the Note track. Group Notes are not endorsed by W3C nor its Members.

Please send feedback by filing issues in GitHub (preferred), including the spec code “indexes” in the title, like this: “[indexes] …summary of comment…”. All issues and comments are archived. Alternately, feedback can be sent to the (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org.

This document is governed by the 2 November 2021 W3C Process Document.

The 15 September 2020 W3C Patent Policy does not carry any licensing requirements or commitments on this document.

1. Introduction

This is a non-normative document. It lists every term defined in CSS, as long as it’s marked up correctly for the spec generator. It is intended as a reference document for authors, implementors, and spec authors, to aid in finding the definition for a term hidden somewhere in the haystack of CSS specs.

There are some things missing, and there are several mistakes, either from use of legacy markup patterns that haven’t been updated yet, or the dfn-type-autodetector misfiring. These will be cleaned up over time.

A notable absence at the moment is a list of all the "dfn" type definitions—the ordinary words and phrases given meaning in CSS. This will show up shortly, as soon as I add a mechanism to limit the index generation to specs from a particular group. (Right now you have to either list every spec you want explicitly, or draw from all specs.)

2. Properties and Descriptors

3. Property/Descriptor Values

4. Grammar Productions / Types

5. Functions

6. At-Rules

7. Selectors

Conformance

Document conventions

Conformance requirements are expressed with a combination of descriptive assertions and RFC 2119 terminology. The key words “MUST”, “MUST NOT”, “REQUIRED”, “SHALL”, “SHALL NOT”, “SHOULD”, “SHOULD NOT”, “RECOMMENDED”, “MAY”, and “OPTIONAL” in the normative parts of this document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119. However, for readability, these words do not appear in all uppercase letters in this specification.

All of the text of this specification is normative except sections explicitly marked as non-normative, examples, and notes. [RFC2119]

Examples in this specification are introduced with the words “for example” or are set apart from the normative text with class="example", like this:

This is an example of an informative example.

Informative notes begin with the word “Note” and are set apart from the normative text with class="note", like this:

Note, this is an informative note.

Advisements are normative sections styled to evoke special attention and are set apart from other normative text with <strong class="advisement">, like this: UAs MUST provide an accessible alternative.

Conformance classes

Conformance to this specification is defined for three conformance classes:

style sheet
A CSS style sheet.
renderer
A UA that interprets the semantics of a style sheet and renders documents that use them.
authoring tool
A UA that writes a style sheet.

A style sheet is conformant to this specification if all of its statements that use syntax defined in this module are valid according to the generic CSS grammar and the individual grammars of each feature defined in this module.

A renderer is conformant to this specification if, in addition to interpreting the style sheet as defined by the appropriate specifications, it supports all the features defined by this specification by parsing them correctly and rendering the document accordingly. However, the inability of a UA to correctly render a document due to limitations of the device does not make the UA non-conformant. (For example, a UA is not required to render color on a monochrome monitor.)

An authoring tool is conformant to this specification if it writes style sheets that are syntactically correct according to the generic CSS grammar and the individual grammars of each feature in this module, and meet all other conformance requirements of style sheets as described in this module.

Partial implementations

So that authors can exploit the forward-compatible parsing rules to assign fallback values, CSS renderers must treat as invalid (and ignore as appropriate) any at-rules, properties, property values, keywords, and other syntactic constructs for which they have no usable level of support. In particular, user agents must not selectively ignore unsupported component values and honor supported values in a single multi-value property declaration: if any value is considered invalid (as unsupported values must be), CSS requires that the entire declaration be ignored.

Implementations of Unstable and Proprietary Features

To avoid clashes with future stable CSS features, the CSSWG recommends following best practices for the implementation of unstable features and proprietary extensions to CSS.

Non-experimental implementations

Once a specification reaches the Candidate Recommendation stage, non-experimental implementations are possible, and implementors should release an unprefixed implementation of any CR-level feature they can demonstrate to be correctly implemented according to spec.

To establish and maintain the interoperability of CSS across implementations, the CSS Working Group requests that non-experimental CSS renderers submit an implementation report (and, if necessary, the testcases used for that implementation report) to the W3C before releasing an unprefixed implementation of any CSS features. Testcases submitted to W3C are subject to review and correction by the CSS Working Group.

Further information on submitting testcases and implementation reports can be found from on the CSS Working Group’s website at http://www.w3.org/Style/CSS/Test/. Questions should be directed to the public-css-testsuite@w3.org mailing list.

References

Normative References

[RFC2119]
S. Bradner. Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate Requirement Levels. March 1997. Best Current Practice. URL: https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/html/rfc2119

Issues Index

A notable absence at the moment is a list of all the "dfn" type definitions—the ordinary words and phrases given meaning in CSS. This will show up shortly, as soon as I add a mechanism to limit the index generation to specs from a particular group. (Right now you have to either list every spec you want explicitly, or draw from all specs.)